A leader in biosciences

Dr. Glenna Burmer is a molecular pathologist and a founder of LifeSpan BioSciences, a Seattle healthcare company that is a world leader in the antibody industry. LSBio is a research reagent and contract research company with a catalogue of 300,000 antibodies to more than 20,000 targets, including virtually all of the proteins in the human genome.

As LSBio’s chief pathologist, Dr. Burmer has utilized her expertise in immunohistochemistry to analyze thousands of research and clinical antibodies, performed contract research for the world’s largest pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, and created immunohistochemistry databases on the most commercially interesting drug and diagnostic targets. She was also an inventor of an automated image capture and cancer analysis microscope that was subsequently commercialized and spun off as a company.

Dr. Burmer’s areas of expertise include pathology, immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and genomics. Her current research interests include the genome-to-proteome analysis of pathological samples, using deep sequencing and RNA quantification to identify mutations that correlate with functional loss or gain of gene and protein expression, and their correlation with tissue pathology. Her professional career has been devoted to identifying the next generation of diagnostic and immunotherapeutic targets for cancer and the diseases of aging.

Dr. Burmer received her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington, received postgraduate training in anatomic pathology at the UW Department of Pathology and postdoctoral training in molecular biology with Dr. Lawrence Loeb. She was also an assistant professor of pathology from 1989-1992. She joined PathoGenesis Corporation as director of Novel Pathogen Discovery from 1992-1995, and has been chief scientific officer, director of pathology and executive vice president at LSBio from 1996 until the present. She has numerous awards, patents and publications in the fields of molecular biology, aging and cancer research.