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Burmer animated video wins award at Santa Monica Short Film Festival

Glenna Burmer’s Nana korobi, Ya oki, a story about a young girl in Hokkaido who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm, has once again been selected an award winner – this time by the Santa Monica Short Film Festival.  Burmer’s entry won this month’s Best Animation Award.

The film’s title is from a well-known Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.” The short film was created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Oregon. The original music featuring woodwinds and strings was composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

This is the third film festival in which Nana korobi, Ya oki has taken top honors. The short film won Best Animation and Best Female Composer awards on April 7 from the Toronto International Women Film Festival. Earlier this year, Burmer won the Outstanding Achievement Award for Animated Short from IndieX Film Festival.

Santa Monica has been an artistic center of Southern California for generations. Its Short Film Festival is dedicated to finding new voices and perspectives to celebrate the power of cinema, independent filmmaking and art, acting as a cultural alternative to the commercial film experience. Each year, festival officials screen the best of the monthly editions in the annual screening and competition.

Nana korobi, Ya oki uses a dreamy animation style that reflects sumi-e art, a Japanese artistic style that employs black ink and distinctive brush strokes. The style was chosen as a tribute to Burmer’s mother, who was a sumi-e artist.

Burmer, a composer and artist, has been producing live concerts, music and dance programs in the Pacific Northwest for a decade. As president of Burmer Music LLC for the past decade, she has produced six contemporary classical music CDs or music compilations, including three concerts at Benaroya Hall in Seattle and a ballet at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Wash.

Acclaimed by audiences and critics alike, her music productions have won several awards, including the 2014 Independent Music Vox Populi Award for both the best contemporary classical album and best instrumental (Celebrate World Music!).

Toronto Women Film Festival selects Burmer animated video for two top awards

Nana korobi, Ya oki , an animated short video with original music by Glenna Burmer, just won two awards today (April 7) from the Toronto International Women Film Festival:  Best Animation and Best Female Composer.

These awards are added to the Outstanding Achievement Award for Animated Short that Burmer won in March from IndieX Film Festival.

Toronto Women Film Festival is a prestigious competition that focuses on female-driven stories, independent female directors, composers, producers, writers and other artists. The festival selects films created by all genders from around the world that contribute to the language of cinema as women in film. Award winners are chosen each month; those who win the monthly competition, such as Burmer, are considered for the annual festival event.

Nana korobi, Ya oki, or Seven Falls, tells the story of a young girl in Hokkaido who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm. The film’s title is from a Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.”

This short video was created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Oregon. The original music featuring woodwinds and strings was composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

The dreamy animation style reflects sumi-e art, a Japanese artistic style that employs black ink and distinctive brush strokes. The style was chosen as a tribute to Burmer’s mother, who was a sumi-e artist. The animated video will be released later this year.

Glenna Burmer is a composer and artist who produces live concerts, music and dance programs that feature original music, choreography and video. As president of Burmer Music LLC for the past decade, she has produced six contemporary classical music CDs or music compilations, including three concerts at Benaroya Hall in Seattle and a ballet at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Wash.

Acclaimed by audiences and critics alike, her productions have won several awards, including the 2014 Independent Music Vox Populi Award for both the best contemporary classical album and best instrumental (Celebrate World Music!).

 

 

 

Glenna Burmer wins Outstanding Achievement Award for animated short

Nana korobi, Ya oki , an animated short video with original music by Glenna Burmer, won the Outstanding Achievement Award for Animated Short in March from IndieX Film Festival.

IndieX Film Festival is a Los Angeles-based international film festival with monthly screenings and Q&A with filmmakers at the Raleigh Studios in Hollywood, California. Projects are judged by a varied team of invited experts from academia and the Los Angeles film industry.

The list of films submitted for consideration in March 2021 came from 15 countries. The winning entries will go on to the next round of competition for the 2021 season.

Nana korobi, Ya oki, or Seven Falls, tells the story of a young girl in Hokkaido who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm. The film’s title is from a Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.”

This short video was created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Oregon. The original music featuring woodwinds and strings was composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

The dreamy animation style reflects sumi-e art, a Japanese artistic style that employs black ink and distinctive brush strokes. The style was chosen as a tribute to Burmer’s mother, who was a sumi-e artist. The animated video will be released later this year.

Animated short feature is newest release from Burmer Music

With concert halls and recording studios shuttered for the past year because of the pandemic, musicians have had to find creative ways to stay productive.

At Burmer Music, owner Glenna Burmer began collaborating as part of a new artistic undertaking — animation.  The result is Nana korobi, Ya oki, a story about a young girl in Hokkaido who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm. The film’s title is from a well-known Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.”

This short video was created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Oregon. The original music featuring woodwinds and strings was composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

The dreamy animation style reflects sumi-e art, a Japanese artistic style that employs black ink and distinctive brush strokes. The style was chosen as a tribute to Burmer’s mother, who was a sumi-e artist. The animated short will be released later this year.

Glenna Burmer is a composer and artist who produces live concerts, music and dance programs that feature original music, choreography and video. As president of Burmer Music LLC for the past decade, she has produced six contemporary classical music CDs or music compilations, including three concerts at Benaroya Hall in Seattle and a ballet at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Wash.

Acclaimed by audiences and critics alike, her productions have won several awards, including the 2014 Independent Music Vox Populi Award for both the best contemporary classical album and best instrumental (Celebrate World Music!).

Two new research reports just published

Two new research papers, authored or co-authored by Glenna Burmer, founder and chief scientist of LifeSpan BioSciences, were recently released. Both are timely explorations of topics related to the current coronavirus pandemic.

In an article entitled “Five easy and effective methods to validate antibodies,” co-published with Nature, Burmer explores ways that researchers can make the most of their antibody-based experiments. “The world of commercial antibodies is the Wild West,” she says. Find out her top five tips here.

With co-authors Vagmita Pabuwal, Division of Bioinformatics, and Mark Burmer, both with LifeSpan BioSciences, Inc., Burmer reviews SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 Pathogenesis. The well-referenced article highlights topic areas from clinical and pathological features to the role of personal protective equipment. Read the full article here.