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Nana korobi, Ya oki selected to tour Britain in 2022

Nana korobi, Ya oki , which won a Best Animation award in the Women Over 50 Film Festival recently, was added to the WOFFF Best of the Fest tour for 2022. WOFFF officials are still working out the details as to where and when, but organizers hope to tour virtually as well as in person next year.

The animated short — written, created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Ore. — got rave reviews from WOFFF film judges Linda McCarthy and Jen Hall. Both women work in animation, McCarthy as a film creator and Hall as the founder and producer of the Manchester Animation Festival.

Sharing their comments with Burmer, the two judges commented on Nana korobi’s animation style, story arc and musical score:

“This film is accomplished and beautiful. The animation and drawing style is excellent and the story arc flowed nicely. The journey has a good combination of menace and resolve with a surprise at the end. The music was lovely and complemented the film.”

Women Over 50 Film Festival showcases the work of women over 50 on screen or behind the camera. This year’s festival was held September 25 – October 2, 2021, in Brighton, England. WOFFF was created in 2014 by Nuala O’Sullivan who wanted to offer a positive and practical response to a lack of visibility that often greets women entering the film world.

Nana korobi, Ya oki, or Seven Falls, tells the story of a young Japanese girl who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm. The film’s title is from a Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.”

The original music, cited in the WOFFF judges’ comments, was composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

Glenna Burmer is a composer and artist who produces live concerts, music and dance programs that feature original music, choreography and video. As president of Burmer Music LLC for the past decade, she has produced six contemporary classical music CDs or music compilations, including three concerts at Benaroya Hall in Seattle and a ballet at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Wash. Nana korobi, Ya oki is her first animated film.

Burmer animated short film takes home two awards from the UK’s Women Over 50 Film Festival

Nana korobi, Ya oki won first place in Animation at the Women Over 50 Film Festival as well as first place for an Audience Choice Award.

The film was written, created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Oregon. The original music featuring woodwinds and strings was composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

Women Over 50 Film Festival showcases the work of women over 50 on screen or behind the camera. This year’s festival was held September 25 – October 2, 2021, in Brighton, England.

WOFFF was created in 2014 by Nuala O’Sullivan, who has written for the BBC and the theater.  In 2014, after writing and producing her own short film, “Microscope,” she saw how underrepresented older women were on both sides of the camera. She launched WOFFF as a positive and practical response to this lack of visibility.

In response to winning the WOFFF awards, Burmer said: “I am thrilled to hear that our film was an audience favorite. It has been an honor and a joy to participate in the festival, and I hope to join again in the future.”

Nana korobi, Ya oki, or Seven Falls, tells the story of a young Japanese girl who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm. The film’s title is from a Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.”

Glenna Burmer is a composer and artist who produces live concerts, music and dance programs that feature original music, choreography and video. As president of Burmer Music LLC for the past decade, she has produced six contemporary classical music CDs or music compilations, including three concerts at Benaroya Hall in Seattle and a ballet at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Wash. Nana korobi, Ya oki is her first animated film.

Animated short film wins awards from festivals in New York, Tokyo, Italy

Nana korobi, Ya oki , an animated short film with original music and story by Glenna Burmer, was an award winner recently in four film festivals headquartered in New York, Tokyo and Avezzano, Italy. To date, the film has received more than 20 awards for Best Animation, Best Score and Outstanding Achievement from film festivals worldwide.

Its most recent awards are:

  • Best Animated Short — New York Neorealism Film Awards
  • Winner, Animated Short  – Golden Short Film Festival, Italy
  • Best Animation – Tokyo International Monthly Film Festival
  • Best Inspirational Film – Stardust Films and Screenplays, New York

Nana korobi, Ya oki, or Seven Falls, is an inspirational story about having the courage and determination to overcome any obstacle in order to do the right thing, which in this case is to save an orphaned friend during a snowstorm.  The film’s title is from a Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.”  

The film was created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Oregon. The original music featuring woodwinds and strings was composed by Glenna Burmer, a composer and artist, and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany. Breiter was the principal animator on the film.

The dreamy animation style reflects sumi-e art, a Japanese artistic style that employs black ink and distinctive brush strokes. The style was chosen as a tribute to Burmer’s mother, who was a sumi-e artist. The animated video will be released later this year.

Glenna Burmer has produced live concerts, music and dance programs that feature original music, choreography and video. As president of Burmer Music LLC for the past decade, she produced six contemporary classical music CDs or music compilations, including three concerts at Benaroya Hall in Seattle and a ballet at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Wash.

Nana korobi, Ya oki is her first animated film.

Burmer animated short film takes home honors in six international festivals

Nana korobi, Ya oki , an animated short film with original music and story by Glenna Burmer, received awards in August and September in six international festivals hosted by film organizations in India. The awards include:

  • Aranmanai International Film Festival
    • Special Jury Award, Best Animated Short Film
  • Black Swan International Film Festival
    • Outstanding Achievement, Animated Films
  • Chaplin Independent Film Festival
    • Best Animation
    • Best Original Score
  • Cult Critic Movie Awards
    • Outstanding Achievement , Animated Films
  • Royal Society of Television & Motion Picture Awards
    • Winner, Animated Film
  • Tagore International Film Festival
    • Outstanding Achievement, Animated Films

Nana korobi, Ya oki, or Seven Falls, tells the story of a young Japanese girl who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm. The film’s title is from a Japanese proverb which says:  “Seven times you may fall, but get up the eighth.”

The short film was created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Oregon. The original music featuring woodwinds and strings was composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

Award-winning Films

The film has won numerous awards this year including best animation, best female composer and outstanding achievement awards. It will be released to the general public this fall.

Glenna Burmer is a composer and artist who produces live concerts, music and dance programs that feature original music, choreography and video. As president of Burmer Music LLC for the past decade, she has produced six contemporary classical music CDs or music compilations, including three concerts at Benaroya Hall in Seattle and a ballet at the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, Wash. Nana korobi, Ya oki is her first animated film.

Best Animated Film award winner at Oregon Short Film Festival

Engaging, visually pleasing with a beautifully composed score – these are some of the comments judges made when selecting Glenna Burmer’s Nana korobi, Ya oki an award winner at the Oregon Short Film Festival.

The judges cited the film’s overall creative style, calling Nana korobi an “inspirational story” and a “great animated tale.” The music received additional commendation, with judges noting that “the score is beautifully composed to guide the viewer on an emotional journey they are sure to remember and enjoy.”

Nana korobi, Ya oki, created and produced by Glenna Burmer with assistance from artistic director Gaby Breiter of Deep Sky Studios in Portland, Ore., tells the story of a young girl in Hokkaido who overcomes seven trials to save an orphan during a snowstorm. The animated short features original music composed by Glenna Burmer and recorded by Dynamedion in Germany.

The film will be screened at the Oregon Short Film Festival on Sunday, Aug. 29, 2021, at the Clinton Street Theater in Portland. The awards ceremony starts at 3 p.m. followed by the festival film screenings. For tickets, go here.

“I am absolutely thrilled to win this award and our team and I look forward to attending the festival in Portland,” Burmer said. “The award is particularly meaningful because our film was a joint Seattle-Portland production.”

View the 2-minute preview of Nana korobi, Ya oki on Vimeo.

Films at the Oregon Short Film Festival are selected for engaging content, creativity, strong production value and great stories that entertain audiences. The Oregon festival is a three-season event on the film festival circuit that attracts filmmakers and screenwriters of all genres who enjoy showcasing their creative works in the Pacific Northwest. The event was founded by author and retired filmmaker Mikel Fair who worked in the film and television industry for nearly two decades.

This spring and summer, Burmer’s film has been recognized at more than a dozen film festivals in the U.S., Canada and India, receiving awards for best animation, best female composer, outstanding achievement and an award of excellence.